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      HomeLatest newsHealth & wellnessWalk this way! How 5-minute strolls at work can boost your mood and cut cravings
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      Walk this way! How 5-minute strolls at work can boost your mood and cut cravings

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      The research has become impossible to ignore: All this sitting we’re doing is doing us in. And while we know staying glued to our office chairs is bad for our health (and our mindset), what’s the alternative? Turns out, it’s pretty simple.

      A recent study supported by Johnson & Johnson found that when people integrated short bursts of walking into a 6-hour day of simulated office work, they felt more energized than when they simply took bathroom breaks.

      The best part for those of us short on time: taking just a 5-minute stroll each hour in the workday boosted mood, countered fatigue and cut food cravings more than a single 30-minute exercise session.

      “Boosting mood and energy doesn’t require a major time commitment; this research proves that a few tweaks to your daily routine can impact and improve well-being,” says
      Jennifer Turgiss, DrPH, Vice President, Behavioral Science and Analytics, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions.

      So go ahead: Make a totally doable New Year’s resolution to get healthier by setting an hourly calendar reminder for 5-minute breaks.

      Soon enough, popping out of your chair may just become second nature.

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