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      Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

      Personal stories
      no-one-would-believe-me-when-i-suspected-i-had-lung-cancer-0923-new.jpg

      “No one would believe me when I suspected I had lung cancer”

      Learn about one patient’s journey toward getting an accurate diagnosis—and why it’s crucial to always advocate for your health.
      Caring & giving
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      How Johnson & Johnson is helping build a sense of belonging by investing in student nurses of color

      A diverse nursing workforce is a better nursing workforce—one that improves quality of care and patient outcomes for all populations. That’s why Johnson & Johnson has put its support behind two pilot programs aimed at setting nurses up for success on campus and in healthcare settings.
      Our Company
      Two volunteers speak to an attendee at a My Health Can't Wait community event in Philadelphia

      My Health Can’t Wait: Working to close the racial health gap through meaningful partnerships and a community-first approach

      Johnson & Johnson recently partnered with two Philadelphia community organizations to support the launch of My Health Can’t Wait, a community wellness initiative connecting people of color with vital health information and resources.
      Health & wellness
      Gay caucasian male couple providing mental health support to each other

      By the numbers: Providing mental health support to the LGBTQIA+ community

      People who identify as LGBTQIA+ are almost three times more likely than their non-LGBTQIA+ counterparts to report poor mental health, but accessing treatment can prove to be challenging. For World Mental Health Day, learn more about the gaps surrounding mental health and how Johnson & Johnson is helping to empower this community.
      Latest news
      Illustration depicting diversity, including a black girl, a black baby and a black woman

      Driving diversity in medical illustration

      For Black History Month, learn how a new online database supported by Johnson & Johnson aims to promote racial health equity by increasing imagery of people of color.
      Latest news
      A close-up of a person holding a baby in a pink shirt

      Johnson & Johnson releases its 2022 Health for Humanity Report and “We All Belong: 2022 DEI Impact Review”

      Together, they detail the company’s ongoing work in helping to create a healthier world, building a more diverse and inclusive workforce, championing global health equity and more.
      Personal stories
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      “My battle with IBD has fueled my passion for helping patients like me”

      Sid Jain, a leader on the pharmaceutical R&D data science team at Johnson & Johnson, knows that new and better treatment options change lives. And being a Crohn’s disease patient himself has supercharged his mission to help revolutionize the research process.
      Personal stories
      A headshot of Hetal Patel, Medical Director, Global Medical Affairs, Immunodermatology at the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson

      “My job is to educate about the need for new treatments for rare diseases”

      Hetal Patel, an immunodermatology medical director at Johnson & Johnson, forged her own career path—and now she’s living into her passion for advocacy, education and innovation.
      Personal stories
      A close-up of a doctor with their arms crossed across their chest

      Advancing diversity: 3 healthcare experts share their career stories

      The statistics are stark: People of color are vastly underrepresented in medical and scientific professions. But various programs—including ones sponsored by Johnson & Johnson—are working to help level the playing field.
      Health & wellness
      A man and a boy getting haircuts at a barber shop

      “As black men, we keep things close to the hip": 5 questions for a urologist about prostate cancer

      The goal to eliminate prostate cancer starts with getting people to talk about it—especially Black men, who are two times more likely to die from the disease than most other men. For Black History Month, we spoke with a physician about building awareness and normalizing tough conversations.