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HomeMedia CenterPress releases PharmaceuticalsJanssen to Highlight Scientific Advances and Commitment to Transform Cancer Care at ASCO and EHA with More than 90 Presentations Showcasing Robust, Differentiated Portfolio and Pipeline in Hematologic Malignancies and Solid Tumors

Janssen to Highlight Scientific Advances and Commitment to Transform Cancer Care at ASCO and EHA with More than 90 Presentations Showcasing Robust, Differentiated Portfolio and Pipeline in Hematologic Malignancies and Solid Tumors

Launch of Multidisciplinary Council of Experts Call-to-Action During EHA Demonstrates Continued Commitment to Innovation in Multiple Myeloma

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RARITAN, N.J., May 18, 2023 — The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that the 2023 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting will feature 50 presentations from the Company’s robust oncology portfolio and pipeline in hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, and 45 additional abstracts will be presented at the European Hematology Association (EHA) 2023 Congress the following week. More than 15 oral presentations and more than 20 investigator-initiated studies will feature new data and updates in multiple myeloma, B-cell malignancies, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and bladder cancer across the Janssen portfolio.

“We are thrilled to showcase the depth and breadth of our oncology portfolio and pipeline at ASCO and EHA this year. Our successful approach of moving therapies into earlier lines of treatment, applying precision medicine strategies and developing combination regimens will be demonstrated across our studies in multiple myeloma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer,” said Peter Lebowitz, M.D., Ph.D., Global Therapeutic Area Head, Oncology, Janssen Research & Development, LLC. “Our deep disease expertise and collaborative innovation strategy has paved the way for Janssen to deliver 13 new medicines in just over 10 years for the patients and families whom we serve.”

“At Janssen, we are dedicated to our mission to reimagine care so patients with cancer can redefine living, and the data we will present at ASCO is a testament to the work we’re doing to bring new treatment options to patients who need them,” said Tyrone Brewer, U.S. President, Oncology, Janssen Biotech, Inc. “This meeting also provides a welcome opportunity to connect with the wider community of dedicated oncology researchers, patients, and advocates, to work together to drive toward a future of continued innovation.”

Key ASCO and EHA Data Presentations

Progressing a commitment to hematology innovation, science, and patient care across lines of treatment and through novel combinations

Commitment to Multiple Myeloma

  • Janssen is committed to changing the course of multiple myeloma and envisions a world where we will move from treat to progression to treat to cure. Janssen will feature new and updated data from its robust portfolio, including therapies for all lines of treatment and data on novel targets and combination regimens to address the needs of patients with this complex, heterogeneous disease.
  • At EHA, Janssen will reinforce its commitment to improving outcomes, patient experience, and care disparities in multiple myeloma through the launch of a first-of-its-kind Global Multiple Myeloma Call-to-Action (CTA). This CTA has been developed by a multidisciplinary council including clinical leaders, patient advocates, and policy experts from across the globe, supported by Janssen. It focuses on areas of greatest unmet need in multiple myeloma with the aim of unifying the global community around common goals and inspiring action to shape the future of multiple myeloma care.

Multiple Myeloma

  • At ASCO, an oral presentation on the Phase 3 randomized CARTITUDE-4 study of CARVYKTI® provides the pivotal data compared to standard-of-care regimens in patients with lenalidomide-refractory multiple myeloma who have had one to three prior lines of treatment. These data will also be featured in the plenary session at EHA. These results will underscore the potential of CARVYKTI® in providing therapy for patients with relapsed and lenalidomide refractory multiple myeloma, (Abstracts #LBA106 and #S100, respectively).
  • First reported data from the Phase 1b RedirecTT-1 study evaluating the treatment combination of two of Janssen’s bispecific antibodies, TECVAYLI® (teclistamab-cqyv, BCMAxCD3) and talquetamab (GPRC5DxCD3), in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) will be presented at ASCO and EHA as oral presentations, (Abstracts #8002 and #S190, respectively). This is the first and only data combining two T-cell redirecting antibodies in multiple myeloma.
  • Updated data from the TRIMM-2 study, including responses in patients treated with prior T-cell redirecting therapies, will be presented in an oral presentation at ASCO, studying talquetamab in combination with DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj), (Abstract #8003).
  • In RRMM, longer-term follow-up data from the MajesTEC-1 study, which led to the U.S. FDA approval of TECVAYLI® in 2022, will be presented as a poster at both ASCO and EHA, (Abstracts #8011 and #P879, respectively). Data from the MajesTEC-1 study evaluating prophylactic tocilizumab for the reduction of cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and data highlighting a biweekly dosing schedule of TECVAYLI® will be featured as poster presentations, (Abstracts #8033 and #8034, respectively).
  • Updated Phase 1/2 data from the pivotal MonumenTAL-1 study of talquetamab, in addition to longer-term follow-up data at both recommended Phase 2 doses (RP2Ds), will be presented via a poster at each meeting, (Abstracts #8036 and #P892, respectively). Additionally, findings from an analysis of infections and parameters of humoral immunity in patients with RRMM treated with talquetamab in the MonumenTAL-1 study will be presented at ASCO, (Abstract #8020).
  • In newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM), a poster presentation at ASCO will feature an indirect treatment comparison of two core frontline triplet regimens. This comparison is based on data from the Phase 3 MAIA trial, evaluating DARZALEX® (daratumumab) in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (DRd) compared to Rd alone in transplant-ineligible patients, and the Phase 3 SWOG SO777 trial evaluating bortezomib in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (VRD) versus Rd, (Abstract #8037).

B-cell Malignancies

  • Four-year follow-up data from the fixed-duration (FD) cohort of the Phase 2 CAPTIVATE study will be featured in a poster presentation at each meeting. This study evaluates an investigational combination regimen of IMBRUVICA® (ibrutinib) plus venetoclax (I+V) for newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), (Abstracts #7535 and #P617, respectively).

Advancing the Science of Solid Tumors Through Precision Medicine
Janssen’s continued innovation in solid tumors focuses on advancing precision medicine options for patients with biomarker-driven disease who have limited targeted treatment options and moving patients into earlier lines of therapy when treatments may be more effective.

Lung Cancer

  • An oral presentation will report results from Cohort D of the CHRYSALIS-2 study on efforts to identify predictive biomarkers for treatment with RYBREVANT® (amivantamab-vmjw) plus lazertinib among patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the post-osimertinib setting, (Abstract #9013).
  • Longer-term follow-up data from the CHRYSALIS study evaluating RYBREVANT® in combination with lazertinib as a first-line therapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with common EGFR mutations will be presented as a poster, (Abstract #9134).
  • Updated safety results from the Phase 1b PALOMA study evaluating the investigational use of subcutaneous RYBREVANT® in patients with advanced solid tumors will also be presented as a poster, (Abstract #9126).

GU Cancers

  • A late-breaking oral presentation will report the final analysis from Cohort 1 of the Phase 3 THOR confirmatory study, evaluating BALVERSA® (erdafitinib) versus chemotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC) with susceptible fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) alterations, (Abstract #LBA4619).
  • Two additional oral presentations at ASCO from Janssen’s bladder cancer clinical program include the final results from the Phase 2 NORSE study evaluating BALVERSA® alone and in combination with cetrelimab in patients with mUC and FGFR alterations and results from the pediatric Match Trial A, evaluating BALVERSA® in children with FGFR-altered tumors, (Abstracts #4504 and #10007, respectively).
  • An oral presentation will report data from CAPTURE, a real-world evidence study evaluating somatic/germline homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutations and outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) receiving first-line treatment stratified by BRCA status, (Abstract #5003).
  • Overall, six poster presentations at ASCO will highlight data evaluating ERLEADA® (apalutamide) in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (ARA-RP), high-risk biochemical relapsed prostate cancer (AFT-19 PRESTO), PSA recurrent prostate cancer (STARTAR), and treatment response in Black and white patients with mCRPC (PANTHER), (Abstracts #5010, #5077, #5016, and #5095, respectively), and evaluating prognostic and predictive abilities of histopathology-based artificial intelligence scores in patients with nmCRPC treated with ERLEADA ®, (Abstracts #5035 and #5027, respectively).

Tumor Agnostic Disease

  • Janssen will present a poster highlighting final data from the RAGNAR study, evaluating the efficacy and safety of BALVERSA® in patients with advanced solid tumors with prespecified FGFR alterations, (Abstract #3121). RAGNAR is a Phase 2 open-label, single-arm, tumor-agnostic trial investigating the efficacy and safety of BALVERSA® in pretreated adult and pediatric patients with advanced solid tumors and FGFR alternations.

Furthering Autoantibody Science for Patients with wAIHA
Janssen continues to advance its Phase 2/3 clinical study exploring nipocalimab, a fully human IgG1 antibody neonatal crystallizable fragment receptor (FcRn) blocker designed to address the underlying cause of autoantibody disease by reducing pathogenic antibodies while maintaining immune function in adults with warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA). wAIHA is a rare, life-threatening autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies that attach to and prematurely destroy healthy red blood cells. Nipocalimab received Fast Track Designation for wAIHA in 2019.[1]

A de novo poster presentation on the characteristics, treatment patterns and healthcare utilization of patients with wAIHA initiating first-line therapy of oral corticosteroids (OCS) with or without rituximab (OCS+R) (EHA Abstract #P1697), will describe real-world treatment patterns and healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) of patients with wAIHA initiating first-line therapy of OCS+R compared to OCS and will illustrate the significant burden of disease and unmet patient need in this rare disease.

A complete list of Janssen-sponsored abstracts at ASCO and EHA is available at: Janssen.com/ASCO2023.

About CARVYKTI®
CARVYKTI® (cilta-cel) received approval by the U.S. FDA in February 2022 for the treatment of adults with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma after four or more prior lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor, an immunomodulatory agent, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.[2] CARVYKTI® is a BCMA-directed, genetically modified autologous T-cell immunotherapy, which involves reprogramming a patient’s own T-cells with a transgene encoding chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that directs the CAR positive T-cells to eliminate cells that express BCMA. BCMA is primarily expressed on the surface of malignant multiple myeloma B-lineage cells, as well as late-stage B-cells and plasma cells. The CARVYKTI® CAR protein features two BCMA-targeting single domains designed to confer high avidity against human BCMA. Upon binding to BCMA-expressing cells, the CAR promotes T-cell activation, expansion, and elimination of target cells.

In December 2017, Janssen Biotech, Inc. entered into an exclusive worldwide license and collaboration agreement with Legend Biotech USA, Inc. to develop and commercialize CARVYKTI®.

For more information, visit www.CARVYKTI.com.

About TECVAYLI®
TECVAYLI® (teclistamab-cqyv) received approval from the U.S. FDA in October 2022 as an off-the-shelf (or ready to use) antibody that is administered as a subcutaneous treatment for adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least four prior lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor, an immunomodulatory agent and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.[3] TECVAYLI® is a first-in-class, T-cell redirecting bispecific antibody which uses innovative science to activate the immune system by binding to the CD3 receptor expressed on the surface of T-cells and to the B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) expressed on the surface of multiple myeloma cells and some healthy B-lineage cells.[4]

For more information, visit www.TECVAYLI.com.

About Talquetamab
Talquetamab is an investigational T-cell redirecting bispecific antibody targeting both GPRC5D, a novel multiple myeloma target that does not shed, and CD3, a primary component of the T-cell receptor.[5] CD3 is involved in activating T-cells, and GPRC5D is highly expressed on multiple myeloma cells.[6],[7]

Talquetamab, which is administered by subcutaneous injection, is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1/2 clinical study for the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (NCT03399799) and is also being explored in combination studies (NCT04586426, NCT05455320) and in a randomized Phase 3 study (NCT05461209). In January 2021, talquetamab was granted PRIME designation by the European Commission. In May 2021, and August 2021, talquetamab was granted Orphan Drug Designation for the treatment of multiple myeloma by the U.S. FDA and the European Commission, respectively. Talquetamab was also granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the U.S. FDA in June 2022 for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have previously received at least four prior lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor, an immunomodulatory agent, and an anti-CD38 antibody.

About DARZALEX FASPRO® and DARZALEX®
DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj) received U.S. FDA approval in May 2020 and is approved for eight indications in multiple myeloma, three of which are for frontline treatment in newly diagnosed patients who are transplant eligible or ineligible.[8] It is the only subcutaneous CD38-directed antibody approved to treat patients with MM. DARZALEX FASPRO® is co-formulated with recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 (rHuPH20), Halozyme’s ENHANZE® drug delivery technology.

DARZALEX® (daratumumab) received U.S. FDA approval in November 2015 and is approved in eight indications, three of which are in the frontline setting, including newly diagnosed patients who are transplant eligible and ineligible.[9]

DARZALEX® is the first CD38-directed antibody approved to treat multiple myeloma.[10] DARZALEX®-based regimens have been used in the treatment of more than 300,000 patients worldwide and more than 68,000 patients in the U.S. alone.

In August 2012, Janssen Biotech, Inc. and Genmab A/S entered a worldwide agreement, which granted Janssen an exclusive license to develop, manufacture and commercialize daratumumab.

Since 2020, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) has recommended daratumumab based combination regimens for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma and relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. For newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, the NCCN® guidelines recommend daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone as a Category 1 preferred regimen in non-transplant candidates; daratumumab in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone as another recommended Category 1 regimen for non-transplant candidates; and daratumumab in combination with bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone as a Category 2A regimen useful in certain circumstances for transplant candidates. In relapsed/refractory myeloma, four daratumumab regimens are listed as Category 1 preferred regimens for early relapses (1-3 prior therapies): daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone; daratumumab in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone; daratumumab in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone; and daratumumab in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone [after one prior therapy including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor (PI)]. The NCCN® also recommends daratumumab in combination with cyclophosphamide, bortezomib and dexamethasone as an other Category 2A regimen for early relapses (1-3 prior therapies) and as monotherapy as a Category 2A regimen useful in certain circumstances for early relapse patients after at least three prior therapies, including a PI and an immunomodulatory agent, or for patients who are double refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent.

For more information, visit www.DARZALEX.com.

About IMBRUVICA®
IMBRUVICA® (ibrutinib) is a once-daily oral medication that is jointly developed and commercialized by Janssen Biotech, Inc. and Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie company. IMBRUVICA® blocks the BTK protein, which is needed by normal and abnormal B-cells, including specific cancer cells, to multiply and spread. By blocking BTK, IMBRUVICA® may help move abnormal B-cells out of their nourishing environments and inhibits their proliferation.[11],[12],[13]

IMBRUVICA® is approved in more than 100 countries and has been used to treat more than 270,000 patients worldwide. There are more than 50 company-sponsored clinical trials, including 18 Phase 3 studies, and more than 11 years evaluating the efficacy and safety of IMBRUVICA®.

IMBRUVICA® was first approved by the U.S. FDA in November 2013, and today is indicated for adult patients in four disease areas, including three hematologic cancers. These include indications to treat adults with CLL/SLL with or without 17p deletion (del17p); adults with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM); and adult and pediatric patients aged one year and older with previously treated chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after failure of one or more lines of systemic therapy.[14]

For more information, visit www.IMBRUVICA.com.

About RYBREVANT®
RYBREVANT® (amivantamab-vmjw) received accelerated approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in May 2021 for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test, whose disease has progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[15] This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the confirmatory trials. RYBREVANT® has also received approval from health authorities in Europe, as well as other markets around the world.

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer prefer NGS-based strategies over PCR-based approaches for the detection of EGFR exon 20 insertion variants and include amivantamab-vmjw (RYBREVANT®) as a subsequent therapy option with a Category 2A recommendation for patients that have progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy and have EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation-positive advanced NSCLC.[16]15†^

RYBREVANT® is being studied in multiple clinical trials in NSCLC, including:

  • As first-line therapy in the Phase 3 MARIPOSA (NCT04487080) study assessing amivantamab in combination with lazertinib, a novel third generation EGFR TKI, against osimertinib and against lazertinib alone in untreated advanced EGFR-mutated NSCLC.[17]
  • The Phase 3 MARIPOSA-2 (NCT04988295) study assessing the efficacy of both lazertinib, amivantamab and carboplatin-pemetrexed, and Amivantamab and carboplatin-pemetrexed, versus carboplatin-pemetrexed in patients with locally advanced or metastatic EGFR exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R substitution NSCLC after osimertinib failure.[18]
  • The Phase 1 CHRYSALIS (NCT02609776) study evaluating amivantamab in participants with advanced NSCLC.[19]
  • The Phase 1/1b CHRYSALIS-2 (NCT04077463) study evaluating amivantamab in combination with lazertinib and lazertinib as a monotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC with EGFR mutations.[20]
  • The Phase 3 PAPILLON (NCT04538664) study assessing amivantamab in combination with carboplatin-pemetrexed versus chemotherapy alone in patients with advanced or metastatic EGFR-mutated NSCLC and exon 20 insertion mutations.[21]
  • The Phase 1 PALOMA (NCT04606381) study assessing the feasibility of subcutaneous (SC) administration of amivantamab based on safety and pharmacokinetics and to determine a dose, dose regimen and formulation for amivantamab SC delivery.[22]
  • The Phase 2 PALOMA-2 (NCT05498428) study assessing subcutaneously administered Amivantamab, as a monotherapy and combinations, in participants with advanced or metastatic solid tumors including EGFR-mutated NSCLC.[23]
  • The Phase 3 PALOMA-3 (NCT05388669) study assessing lazertinib with subcutaneous amivantamab as compared to intravenous amivantamab in participants with EGFR-mutated advanced or metastatic NSCLC.[24]
  • The Phase 1/2 METalmark (NCT05488314) study assessing amivantamab and capmatinib combination therapy in unresectable metastatic NSCLC.[25]

For more information, visit: https://www.RYBREVANT.com.

About Lazertinib
Lazertinib is an oral, third-generation, brain-penetrant, EGFR TKI that targets both the T790M mutation and activating EGFR mutations while sparing wild type-EGFR. In 2018, Janssen Biotech, Inc. entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Yuhan Corporation for the development of lazertinib.

About BALVERSA®
BALVERSA® (erdafitinib) is a once-daily, oral FGFR kinase inhibitor that is approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of adults with locally advanced or mUC that has susceptible FGFR3 or FGFR2 genetic alterations and has progressed during or following at least one line of platinum-containing chemotherapy, including within 12 months of neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-containing chemotherapy. Patients are selected for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for BALVERSA®. Information on FDA-approved tests for the detection of FGFR genetic alterations in urothelial cancer is available at: http://www.fda.gov/CompanionDiagnostics. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

In addition to the Phase 3 THOR study, BALVERSA® is being studied in the Phase 2 THOR-2/BLC2003 study (NCT04172675) study examining BALVERSA® versus investigator choice of intravesical chemotherapy in participants who received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin and recurred with high risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer; the Phase 2 RAGNAR (NCT04083976) study assessing BALVERSA® in patients with advanced solid tumors and FGFR genetic alterations; and the Phase 1b/2 NORSE (NCT03473743) study evaluating BALVERSA® in combination with cetrelimab in patients with locally advanced or mUC with FGFR3 or FGFR2 genetic alterations who are ineligible for cisplatin.

In 2008, Janssen entered into an exclusive worldwide license and collaboration agreement with Astex Pharmaceuticals to develop and commercialize BALVERSA®.

For more information, visit www.BALVERSA.com.

About ERLEADA®
ERLEADA® (apalutamide) is an androgen receptor signaling inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC) and for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC).[26] ERLEADA® received U.S. Food and Administration (FDA) approval for nmCRPC in February 2018, and received U.S. FDA approval for mCSPC in September 2019.26 To date, more than 100,000 patients worldwide have been treated with ERLEADA®.

For more information, visit www.ERLEADA.com.

About Nipocalimab
Nipocalimab is a high affinity, fully human, aglycosylated, effectorless anti-FcRn IgG1 monoclonal antibody being studied for autoantibody-driven conditions including generalized myasthenia gravis in children and adults, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hemolytic diseases of the fetus and newborn, warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, and rheumatoid arthritis.[27],[28],[29],[30],[31],[32],[33],[34],[35],[36] Nipocalimab targets FcRn, which plays a central role in prolonging the half–life of IgG autoantibodies.27 Blockade of this receptor has the potential to reduce overall IgG autoantibody levels without widespread immune suppression. In 2019, nipocalimab received Fast Track Designation for wAIHA.1

In 2020, Johnson & Johnson acquired Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc., including full global rights to nipocalimab.

CARVYKTI® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: CYTOKINE RELEASE SYNDROME, NEUROLOGIC TOXICITIES, HLH/MAS, and PROLONGED and RECURRENT CYTOPENIA

Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with CARVYKTI®. Do not administer CARVYKTI® to patients with active infection or inflammatory disorders. Treat severe or life-threatening CRS with tocilizumab or tocilizumab and corticosteroids.

Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS), which may be fatal or life-threatening, occurred following treatment with CARVYKTI®, including before CRS onset, concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. Monitor for neurologic events after treatment with CARVYKTI®. Provide supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed.

Parkinsonism and Guillain-Barré syndrome and their associated complications resulting in fatal or life-threatening reactions have occurred following treatment with CARVYKTI®.

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (HLH/MAS), including fatal and life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with CARVYKTI®. HLH/MAS can occur with CRS or neurologic toxicities.

Prolonged and/or recurrent cytopenias with bleeding and infection and requirement for stem cell transplantation for hematopoietic recovery occurred following treatment with CARVYKTI®.

CARVYKTI® is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the CARVYKTI® REMS Program.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS) including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred following treatment with CARVYKTI® in 95% (92/97) of patients receiving ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Grade 3 or higher CRS (2019 ASTCT grade) occurred in 5% (5/97) of patients, with Grade 5 CRS reported in 1 patient. The median time to onset of CRS was 7 days (range: 112 days). The most common manifestations of CRS included pyrexia (100%), hypotension (43%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (22%), chills (15%), increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (14%) and sinus tachycardia (11%). Grade 3 or higher events associated with CRS included increased AST and ALT, hyperbilirubinemia, hypotension, pyrexia, hypoxia, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation and hemorrhage, HLH/MAS, angina pectoris, supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, malaise, myalgias, increased C-reactive protein, ferritin, blood alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.

Identify CRS based on clinical presentation. Evaluate for and treat other causes of fever, hypoxia, and hypotension. CRS has been reported to be associated with findings of HLH/MAS, and the physiology of the syndromes may overlap. HLH/MAS is a potentially life-threatening condition. In patients with progressive symptoms of CRS or refractory CRS despite treatment, evaluate for evidence of HLH/MAS. One patient with CRS and suspected HLH/MAS developed a fatal retroperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy and anticoagulation.

Sixty-nine of 97 (71%) patients received tocilizumab and/or a corticosteroid for CRS after infusion of ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Forty-four (45%) patients received only tocilizumab, of whom 33 (34%) received a single dose and 11 (11%) received more than one dose; 24 patients (25%) received tocilizumab and a corticosteroid, and one patient (1%) received only corticosteroids. Ensure that a minimum of two doses of tocilizumab are available prior to infusion of CARVYKTI®.

Monitor patients at least daily for 10 days following CARVYKTI® infusion at a REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs and symptoms of CRS. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of CRS for at least 4 weeks after infusion. At the first sign of CRS, immediately institute treatment with supportive care, tocilizumab, or tocilizumab and corticosteroids.

Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms of CRS occur at any time.

Neurologic toxicities, which may be severe, life-threatening or fatal, occurred following treatment with CARVYKTI®. Neurologic toxicities included ICANS, neurologic toxicity with signs and symptoms of parkinsonism, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, immune mediated myelitis, peripheral neuropathies, and cranial nerve palsies. Counsel patients on the signs and symptoms of these neurologic toxicities, and on the delayed nature of onset of some of these toxicities. Instruct patients to seek immediate medical attention for further assessment and management if signs or symptoms of any of these neurologic toxicities occur at any time.

Overall, one or more subtypes of neurologic toxicity described below occurred following ciltacabtagene autoleucel in 26% (25/97) of patients, of which 11% (11/97) of patients experienced Grade 3 or higher events. These subtypes of neurologic toxicities were also observed in two ongoing studies.

Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS): Patients may experience fatal or life-threatening ICANS following treatment with CARVYKTI®, including before CRS onset, concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. ICANS occurred in 23% (22/97) of patients receiving ciltacabtagene autoleucel including Grade 3 or 4 events in 3% (3/97) and Grade 5 (fatal) events in 2% (2/97). The median time to onset of ICANS was 8 days (range 1-28 days). All 22 patients with ICANS had CRS. The most frequent (≥5%) manifestation of ICANS included encephalopathy (23%), aphasia (8%) and headache (6%).

Monitor patients at least daily for 10 days following CARVYKTI® infusion at the REMS certified healthcare facility for signs and symptoms of ICANS. Rule out other causes of ICANS symptoms. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of ICANS for at least 4 weeks after infusion and treat promptly. Neurologic toxicity should be managed with supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed.

Parkinsonism: Of the 25 patients in the CARTITUDE-1 study experiencing any neurotoxicity, five male patients had neurologic toxicity with several signs and symptoms of parkinsonism, distinct from immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS). Neurologic toxicity with parkinsonism has been reported in other ongoing trials of ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Patients had parkinsonian and non-parkinsonian symptoms that included tremor, bradykinesia, involuntary movements, stereotypy, loss of spontaneous movements, masked facies, apathy, flat affect, fatigue, rigidity, psychomotor retardation, micrographia, dysgraphia, apraxia, lethargy, confusion, somnolence, loss of consciousness, delayed reflexes, hyperreflexia, memory loss, difficulty swallowing, bowel incontinence, falls, stooped posture, shuffling gait, muscle weakness and wasting, motor dysfunction, motor and sensory loss, akinetic mutism, and frontal lobe release signs. The median onset of parkinsonism in the 5 patients in CARTITUDE-1 was 43 days (range 15-108) from infusion of ciltacabtagene autoleucel.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of parkinsonism that may be delayed in onset and managed with supportive care measures. There is limited efficacy information with medications used for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, for the improvement or resolution of parkinsonism symptoms following CARVYKTI® treatment.

Guillain-Barré Syndrome: A fatal outcome following Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) has occurred in another ongoing study of ciltacabtagene autoleucel despite treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Symptoms reported include those consistent with Miller-Fisher variant of GBS, encephalopathy, motor weakness, speech disturbances and polyradiculoneuritis.

Monitor for GBS. Evaluate patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy for GBS. Consider treatment of GBS with supportive care measures and in conjunction with immunoglobulin and plasma exchange, depending on severity of GBS.

Immune Mediated Myelitis: Grade 3 myelitis has occurred 25 days following treatment in another ongoing study. Symptoms reported included hypoesthesia of the lower extremities and the lower abdomen with impaired sphincter control. Symptoms improved with the use of corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. Myelitis was ongoing at the time of death from other cause.

Peripheral Neuropathy: Six patients in CARTITUDE-1 developed peripheral neuropathy. These neuropathies presented as sensory, motor or sensorimotor neuropathies. Median time of onset of symptoms was 62 days (range 4-136 days), median duration of peripheral neuropathies was 256 days (range 2-465 days) including those with ongoing neuropathy. Patients who experienced peripheral neuropathy also experienced cranial nerve palsies or GBS in other ongoing trials of ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathies.

Cranial Nerve Palsies: Three patients (3.1%) experienced cranial nerve palsies in CARTITUDE-1. All three patients had 7th cranial nerve palsy; one patient had 5th cranial nerve palsy as well. Median time to onset was 26 days (range 21-101 days) following infusion of ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Occurrence of 3rd and 6th cranial nerve palsy, bilateral 7th cranial nerve palsy, worsening of cranial nerve palsy after improvement, and occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in patients with cranial nerve palsy have also been reported in ongoing trials of ciltacabtagene autoleucel. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of cranial nerve palsies. Consider management with systemic corticosteroids, depending on the severity and progression of signs and symptoms.

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH)/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS): Fatal HLH occurred in one patient (1%), 99 days after ciltacabtagene autoleucel. The HLH event was preceded by prolonged CRS lasting 97 days. The manifestations of HLH/MAS include hypotension, hypoxia with diffuse alveolar damage, coagulopathy, cytopenia, and multi-organ dysfunction, including renal dysfunction.

One patient with Grade 4 HLH/MAS developed fatal intracerebral and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in the setting of coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia 12 days after treatment in another ongoing study. Patients who develop HLH/MAS have an increased risk of severe bleeding. Monitor hematological parameters in patients with HLH/MAS and transfuse per institutional guidelines.

HLH is a life-threatening condition with a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated early. Treatment of HLH/MAS should be administered per institutional standards.

CARVYKTI® REMS: Because of the risk of CRS and neurologic toxicities, CARVYKTI® is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the CARVYKTI® REM
Further information is available at https://www.carvyktirems.com/ or 1-844-672-0067.

Prolonged and Recurrent Cytopenias: Patients may exhibit prolonged and recurrent cytopenias following lymphodepleting chemotherapy and CARVYKTI® infusion. One patient underwent autologous stem cell therapy for hematopoietic reconstitution due to prolonged thrombocytopenia.

In CARTITUDE-1, 30% (29/97) of patients experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and 41% (40/97) of patients experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia that had not resolved by Day 30 following ciltacabtagene autoleucel infusion.

Recurrent Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and anemia were seen in 63% (61/97), 18% (17/97), 60% (58/97), and 37% (36/97) after recovery from initial Grade 3 or 4 cytopenia following infusion. After Day 60 following ciltacabtagene autoleucel infusion, 31%, 12% and 6% of patients had a recurrence of Grade 3 or higher lymphopenia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, respectively, after initial recovery of their Grade 3 or 4 cytopenia. Eighty-seven percent (84/97) of patients had one, two, or three or more recurrences of Grade 3 or 4 cytopenias after initial recovery of Grade 3 or 4 cytopenia. Six and 11 patients had Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, respectively, at the time of death.

Monitor blood counts prior to and after CARVYKTI® infusion. Manage cytopenias with growth factors and blood product transfusion support according to local institutional guidelines.

Infections: CARVYKTI® should not be administered to patients with active infection or inflammatory disorders. Severe, life-threatening or fatal infections occurred in patients after CARVYKTI® infusion.

Infections (all grades) occurred in 57 (59%) patients. Grade 3 or 4 infections occurred in 23% (22/97) of patients; Grade 3 or 4 infections with an unspecified pathogen occurred in 17%, viral infections in 7%, bacterial infections in 1%, and fungal infections in 1% of patients. Overall, four patients had Grade 5 infections: lung abscess (n=1), sepsis (n=2) and pneumonia (n=1).

Grade 5 infections reported in other studies include bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and CMV colitis (with HSV-1 hepatitis). Another patient developed mycotic aneurysm due to cerebral aspergillosis and died of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection before and after CARVYKTI® infusion and treat patients appropriately. Administer prophylactic, pre-emptive and/or therapeutic antimicrobials according to the standard institutional guidelines. Febrile neutropenia was observed in 10% of patients after ciltacabtagene autoleucel infusion, and may be concurrent with CRS. In the event of febrile neutropenia, evaluate for infection and manage with broad-spectrum antibiotics, fluids and other supportive care, as medically indicated.

In a randomized controlled study of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (CARTITUDE-4), patients treated with ciltacabtagene autoleucel had an increased rate of fatal COVID-19 infections compared to the standard therapy arm. Counsel patients on the importance of prevention measures. Follow institutional guidelines for the vaccination and management of immunocompromised patients with COVID-19.

Viral Reactivation: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure and death, can occur in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. Perform screening for Cytomegalovirus (CMV), HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or any other infectious agents if clinically indicated in accordance with clinical guidelines before collection of cells for manufacturing. Consider antiviral therapy to prevent viral reactivation per local institutional guidelines/clinical practice.

Hypogammaglobulinemia was reported as an adverse event in 12% (12/97) of patients; laboratory IgG levels fell below 500 mg/dL after infusion in 92% (89/97) of patients. Monitor immunoglobulin levels after treatment with CARVYKTI® and administer IVIG for IgG <400 mg/dL. Manage per local institutional guidelines, including infection precautions and antibiotic or antiviral prophylaxis.

Use of Live Vaccines: The safety of immunization with live viral vaccines during or following CARVYKTI® treatment has not been studied. Vaccination with live virus vaccines is not recommended for at least 6 weeks prior to the start of lymphodepleting chemotherapy, during CARVYKTI® treatment, and until immune recovery following treatment with CARVYKTI®.

Hypersensitivity Reactions have occurred in 5% (5/97) of patients following ciltacabtagene autoleucel infusion. Serious hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, may be due to the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in CARVYKTI®. Patients should be carefully monitored for 2 hours after infusion for signs and symptoms of severe reaction. Treat promptly and manage appropriately according to the severity of the hypersensitivity reaction.

Secondary Malignancies: Patients may develop secondary malignancies. Monitor life-long for secondary malignancies. In the event that a secondary malignancy occurs, contact Janssen Biotech, Inc., at 1-800-526-7736 for reporting and to obtain instructions on collection of patient samples for testing of secondary malignancy of T-cell origin.

Effects on Ability to Drive and Use Machines: Due to the potential for neurologic events, including altered mental status, seizures, neurocognitive decline, or neuropathy, patients are at risk for altered or decreased consciousness or coordination in the 8 weeks following CARVYKTI® infusion. Advise patients to refrain from driving and engaging in hazardous occupations or activities, such as operating heavy or potentially dangerous machinery during this initial period, and in the event of new onset of any neurologic toxicities.

ADVERSE REACTIONS
The most common non-laboratory adverse reactions (incidence greater than 20%) are pyrexia, cytokine release syndrome, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypotension, musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, infections of unspecified pathogen, cough, chills, diarrhea, nausea, encephalopathy, decreased appetite, upper respiratory tract infection, headache, tachycardia, dizziness, dyspnea, edema, viral infections, coagulopathy, constipation, and vomiting. The most common laboratory adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 50%) include thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, aminotransferase elevation, and hypoalbuminemia.

Please read full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning, for CARVYKTI®.

TECVAYLI® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
WARNING: CYTOKINE RELEASE SYNDROME and NEUROLOGIC TOXICITY including IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL-ASSOCIATED NEUROTOXICITY SYNDROME

Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), including life-threatening or fatal reactions, can occur in patients receiving TECVAYLI®. Initiate treatment with TECVAYLI® step-up dosing schedule to reduce risk of CRS. Withhold TECVAYLI® until CRS resolves or permanently discontinue based on severity.

Neurologic toxicity, including Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS) and serious and life-threatening reactions, can occur in patients receiving TECVAYLI®. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of neurologic toxicity, including ICANS, during treatment. Withhold TECVAYLI® until neurologic toxicity resolves or permanently discontinue based on severity.

TECVAYLI® is available only through a restricted program called the TECVAYLI® Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS).

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Cytokine Release Syndrome - TECVAYLI® can cause cytokine release syndrome (CRS), including life-threatening or fatal reactions. In the clinical trial, CRS occurred in 72% of patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose, with Grade 1 CRS occurring in 50% of patients, Grade 2 in 21%, and Grade 3 in 0.6%. Recurrent CRS occurred in 33% of patients. Most patients experienced CRS following step-up dose 1 (42%), step-up dose 2 (35%), or the initial treatment dose (24%). Less than 3% of patients developed first occurrence of CRS following subsequent doses of TECVAYLI®. The median time to onset of CRS was 2 (range: 1 to 6) days after the most recent dose with a median duration of 2 (range: 1 to 9) days. Clinical signs and symptoms of CRS included, but were not limited to, fever, hypoxia, chills, hypotension, sinus tachycardia, headache, and elevated liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase elevation).

Initiate therapy according to TECVAYLI® step-up dosing schedule to reduce risk of CRS. Administer pretreatment medications to reduce risk of CRS and monitor patients following administration of TECVAYLI® accordingly. At the first sign of CRS, immediately evaluate patient for hospitalization. Administer supportive care based on severity and consider further management per current practice guidelines. Withhold or permanently discontinue TECVAYLI® based on severity.

TECVAYLI® is available only through a restricted program under a REMS.

Neurologic Toxicity including ICANS - TECVAYLI® can cause serious or life-threatening neurologic toxicity, including Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome (ICANS).

In the clinical trial, neurologic toxicity occurred in 57% of patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose, with Grade 3 or 4 neurologic toxicity occurring in 2.4% of patients. The most frequent neurologic toxicities were headache (25%), motor dysfunction (16%), sensory neuropathy (15%), and encephalopathy (13%). With longer follow-up, Grade 4 seizure and fatal Guillain-Barré syndrome (one patient each) occurred in patients who received TECVAYLI®.

In the clinical trial, ICANS was reported in 6% of patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose. Recurrent ICANS occurred in 1.8% of patients. Most patients experienced ICANS following step-up dose 1 (1.2%), step-up dose 2 (0.6%), or the initial treatment dose (1.8%). Less than 3% of patients developed first occurrence of ICANS following subsequent doses of TECVAYLI®. The median time to onset of ICANS was 4 (range: 2 to 8) days after the most recent dose with a median duration of 3 (range: 1 to 20) days. The most frequent clinical manifestations of ICANS reported were confusional state and dysgraphia. The onset of ICANS can be concurrent with CRS, following resolution of CRS, or in the absence of CRS.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of neurologic toxicity during treatment. At the first sign of neurologic toxicity, including ICANS, immediately evaluate patient and provide supportive therapy based on severity. Withhold or permanently discontinue TECVAYLI® based on severity per recommendations and consider further management per current practice guidelines.

Due to the potential for neurologic toxicity, patients are at risk of depressed level of consciousness. Advise patients to refrain from driving or operating heavy or potentially dangerous machinery during and for 48 hours after completion of TECVAYLI® step-up dosing schedule and in the event of new onset of any neurologic toxicity symptoms until neurologic toxicity resolves.

TECVAYLI® is available only through a restricted program under a REMS.

TECVAYLI® REMS - TECVAYLI® is available only through a restricted program under a REMS called the TECVAYLI® REMS because of the risks of CRS and neurologic toxicity, including ICANS.

Hepatotoxicity - TECVAYLI® can cause hepatotoxicity, including fatalities. In patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose in the clinical trial, there was one fatal case of hepatic failure. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) occurred in 34% of patients, with Grade 3 or 4 elevations in 1.2%. Elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) occurred in 28% of patients, with Grade 3 or 4 elevations in 1.8%. Elevated total bilirubin occurred in 6% of patients with Grade 3 or 4 elevations in 0.6%. Liver enzyme elevation can occur with or without concurrent CRS.

Monitor liver enzymes and bilirubin at baseline and during treatment as clinically indicated. Withhold TECVAYLI® or consider permanent discontinuation of TECVAYLI® based on severity.

Infections - TECVAYLI® can cause severe, life-threatening, or fatal infections. In patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose in the clinical trial, serious infections, including opportunistic infections, occurred in 30% of patients, with Grade 3 or 4 infections in 35%, and fatal infections in 4.2%. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection prior to and during treatment with TECVAYLI® and treat appropriately. Administer prophylactic antimicrobials according to guidelines. Withhold TECVAYLI® or consider permanent discontinuation of TECVAYLI® based on severit
Monitor immunoglobulin levels during treatment with TECVAYLI® and treat according to guidelines, including infection precautions and antibiotic or antiviral prophylaxis.

Neutropenia - TECVAYLI® can cause neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. In patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose in the clinical trial, decreased neutrophils occurred in 84% of patients, with Grade 3 or 4 decreased neutrophils in 56%. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 3% of patients.

Monitor complete blood cell counts at baseline and periodically during treatment and provide supportive care per local institutional guidelines. Monitor patients with neutropenia for signs of infection. Withhold TECVAYLI® based on severity.

Hypersensitivity and Other Administration Reactions - TECVAYLI® can cause both systemic administration-related and local injection-site reactions. Systemic Reactions - In patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose in the clinical trial, 1.2% of patients experienced systemic-administration reactions, which included Grade 1 recurrent pyrexia and Grade 1 swollen tongue. Local Reactions - In patients who received TECVAYLI® at the recommended dose in the clinical trial, injection-site reactions occurred in 35% of patients, with Grade 1 injection-site reactions in 30% and Grade 2 in 4.8%. Withhold TECVAYLI® or consider permanent discontinuation of TECVAYLI® based on severity.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity - Based on its mechanism of action, TECVAYLI® may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TECVAYLI® and for 5 months after the last dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were pyrexia, CRS, musculoskeletal pain, injection site reaction, fatigue, upper respiratory tract infection, nausea, headache, pneumonia, and diarrhea. The most common Grade 3 to 4 laboratory abnormalities (≥20%) were decreased lymphocytes, decreased neutrophils, decreased white blood cells, decreased hemoglobin, and decreased platelets.
Please read full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING, for TECVAYLI®.

DARZALEX FASPRO® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS

DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma:

  • In combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant
  • In combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant and in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy
  • In combination with bortezomib, thalidomide, and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed patients who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplant
  • In combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in patients who have received at least one prior line of therapy including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor
  • In combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three prior lines of therapy
  • In combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients who have received at least one prior therapy
  • As monotherapy in patients who have received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent or who are double-refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent

CONTRAINDICATIONS
DARZALEX FASPRO® is contraindicated in patients with a history of severe hypersensitivity to daratumumab, hyaluronidase, or any of the components of the formulation.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hypersensitivity and Other Administration Reactions
Both systemic administration-related reactions, including severe or life-threatening reactions, and local injection-site reactions can occur with DARZALEX FASPRO®. Fatal reactions have been reported with daratumumab-containing products, including DARZALEX FASPRO®.

Systemic Reactions
In a pooled safety population of 898 patients with multiple myeloma (N=705) or light chain (AL) amyloidosis (N=193) who received DARZALEX FASPRO® as monotherapy or in combination, 9% of patients experienced a systemic administration-related reaction (Grade 2: 3.2%, Grade 3: 1%). Systemic administration-related reactions occurred in 8% of patients with the first injection, 0.3% with the second injection, and cumulatively 1% with subsequent injections. The median time to onset was 3.2 hours (range: 4 minutes to 3.5 days). Of the 140 systemic administration-related reactions that occurred in 77 patients, 121 (86%) occurred on the day of DARZALEX FASPRO® administration. Delayed systemic administration-related reactions have occurred in 1% of the patients.

Severe reactions included hypoxia, dyspnea, hypertension, tachycardia, and ocular adverse reactions, including choroidal effusion, acute myopia, and acute angle closure glaucoma. Other signs and symptoms of systemic administration-related reactions may include respiratory symptoms, such as bronchospasm, nasal congestion, cough, throat irritation, allergic rhinitis, and wheezing, as well as anaphylactic reaction, pyrexia, chest pain, pruritus, chills, vomiting, nausea, hypotension, and blurred vision.

Pre-medicate patients with histamine-1 receptor antagonist, acetaminophen, and corticosteroids. Monitor patients for systemic administration-related reactions, especially following the first and second injections. For anaphylactic reaction or life-threatening (Grade 4) administration-related reactions, immediately and permanently discontinue DARZALEX FASPRO®. Consider administering corticosteroids and other medications after the administration of DARZALEX FASPRO® depending on dosing regimen and medical history to minimize the risk of delayed (defined as occurring the day after administration) systemic administration-related reactions.

Ocular adverse reactions, including acute myopia and narrowing of the anterior chamber angle due to ciliochoroidal effusions with potential for increased intraocular pressure or glaucoma, have occurred with daratumumab-containing products. If ocular symptoms occur, interrupt DARZALEX FASPRO® and seek immediate ophthalmologic evaluation prior to restarting DARZALEX FASPRO®.

Local Reactions
In this pooled safety population, injection-site reactions occurred in 8% of patients, including Grade 2 reactions in 0.7%. The most frequent (>1%) injection-site reaction was injection-site erythema. These local reactions occurred a median of 5 minutes (range: 0 minutes to 6.5 days) after starting administration of DARZALEX FASPRO®. Monitor for local reactions and consider symptomatic management.

Neutropenia
Daratumumab may increase neutropenia induced by background therapy. Monitor complete blood cell counts periodically during treatment according to manufacturer’s prescribing information for background therapies. Monitor patients with neutropenia for signs of infection. Consider withholding DARZALEX FASPRO® until recovery of neutrophils. In lower body weight patients receiving DARZALEX FASPRO®, higher rates of Grade 3-4 neutropenia were observed.

Thrombocytopenia
Daratumumab may increase thrombocytopenia induced by background therapy. Monitor complete blood cell counts periodically during treatment according to manufacturer’s prescribing information for background therapies. Consider withholding DARZALEX FASPRO® until recovery of platelets.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
Based on the mechanism of action, DARZALEX FASPRO® can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. DARZALEX FASPRO® may cause depletion of fetal immune cells and decreased bone density. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females with reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with DARZALEX FASPRO® and for 3 months after the last dose.

The combination of DARZALEX FASPRO® with lenalidomide, thalidomide, or pomalidomide is contraindicated in pregnant women because lenalidomide, thalidomide, and pomalidomide may cause birth defects and death of the unborn child. Refer to the lenalidomide, thalidomide, or pomalidomide prescribing information on use during pregnancy.

Interference With Serological Testing
Daratumumab binds to CD38 on red blood cells (RBCs) and results in a positive indirect antiglobulin test (indirect Coombs test). Daratumumab-mediated positive indirect antiglobulin test may persist for up to 6 months after the last daratumumab administration. Daratumumab bound to RBCs masks detection of antibodies to minor antigens in the patient’s serum. The determination of a patient’s ABO and Rh blood type are not impacted.

Notify blood transfusion centers of this interference with serological testing and inform blood banks that a patient has received DARZALEX FASPRO®. Type and screen patients prior to starting DARZALEX FASPRO®.

Interference With Determination of Complete Response
Daratumumab is a human immunoglobulin G (IgG) kappa monoclonal antibody that can be detected on both the serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and immunofixation (IFE) assays used for the clinical monitoring of endogenous M-protein. This interference can impact the determination of complete response and of disease progression in some DARZALEX FASPRO®-treated patients with IgG kappa myeloma protein.

ADVERSE REACTIONS
In multiple myeloma, the most common adverse reaction (≥20%) with DARZALEX FASPRO® monotherapy is upper respiratory tract infection. The most common adverse reactions with combination therapy (≥20% for any combination) include fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, dyspnea, insomnia, headache, pyrexia, cough, muscle spasms, back pain, vomiting, hypertension, upper respiratory tract infection, peripheral sensory neuropathy, constipation, pneumonia, and peripheral edema.

The most common hematology laboratory abnormalities (≥40%) with DARZALEX FASPRO® are decreased leukocytes, decreased lymphocytes, decreased neutrophils, decreased platelets, and decreased hemoglobin.

Please click here to see the full Prescribing Information.

DARZALEX® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION 

INDICATIONS
DARZALEX® (daratumumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with multiple myeloma:

  • In combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant and in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy
  • In combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant
  • In combination with bortezomib, thalidomide, and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed patients who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplant
  • In combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients who have received at least one prior therapy
  • In combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three prior lines of therapy
  • In combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone in patients who have received at least two prior therapies including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor
  • As monotherapy in patients who have received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent or who are double-refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent

CONTRAINDICATIONS
DARZALEX® is contraindicated in patients with a history of severe hypersensitivity (eg, anaphylactic reactions) to daratumumab or any of the components of the formulation.  

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Infusion-Related Reactions
DARZALEX® can cause severe and/or serious infusion-related reactions including anaphylactic reactions. These reactions can be life-threatening, and fatal outcomes have been reported. In clinical trials (monotherapy and combination: N=2066), infusion-related reactions occurred in 37% of patients with the Week 1 (16 mg/kg) infusion, 2% with the Week 2 infusion, and cumulatively 6% with subsequent infusions. Less than 1% of patients had a Grade 3/4 infusion-related reaction at Week 2 or subsequent infusions. The median time to onset was 1.5 hours (range: 0 to 73 hours). Nearly all reactions occurred during infusion or within 4 hours of completing DARZALEX®. Severe reactions have occurred, including bronchospasm, hypoxia, dyspnea, hypertension, tachycardia, headache, laryngeal edema, pulmonary edema, and ocular adverse reactions, including choroidal effusion, acute myopia, and acute angle closure glaucoma. Signs and symptoms may include respiratory symptoms, such as nasal congestion, cough, throat irritation, as well as chills, vomiting, and nausea. Less common signs and symptoms were wheezing, allergic rhinitis, pyrexia, chest discomfort, pruritus, hypotension and blurred vision. 

When DARZALEX® dosing was interrupted in the setting of ASCT (CASSIOPEIA) for a median of 3.75 months (range: 2.4 to 6.9 months), upon re-initiation of DARZALEX®, the incidence of infusion-related reactions was 11% for the first infusion following ASCT. Infusion-related reactions occurring at re-initiation of DARZALEX® following ASCT were consistent in terms of symptoms and severity (Grade 3 or 4: <1%) with those reported in previous studies at Week 2 or subsequent infusions. In EQUULEUS, patients receiving combination treatment (n=97) were administered the first 16 mg/kg dose at Week 1 split over two days, ie, 8 mg/kg on Day 1 and Day 2, respectively. The incidence of any grade infusion-related reactions was 42%, with 36% of patients experiencing infusion-related reactions on Day 1 of Week 1, 4% on Day 2 of Week 1, and 8% with subsequent infusions. 

Pre-medicate patients with antihistamines, antipyretics, and corticosteroids. Frequently monitor patients during the entire infusion. Interrupt DARZALEX® infusion for reactions of any severity and institute medical management as needed. Permanently discontinue DARZALEX® therapy if an anaphylactic reaction or life-threatening (Grade 4) reaction occurs and institute appropriate emergency care. For patients with Grade 1, 2, or 3 reactions, reduce the infusion rate when re-starting the infusion.  

To reduce the risk of delayed infusion-related reactions, administer oral corticosteroids to all patients following DARZALEX® infusions. Patients with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may require additional post-infusion medications to manage respiratory complications. Consider prescribing short- and long-acting bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 

Ocular adverse reactions, including acute myopia and narrowing of the anterior chamber angle due to ciliochoroidal effusions with potential for increased intraocular pressure or glaucoma, have occurred with DARZALEX infusion. If ocular symptoms occur, interrupt DARZALEX infusion and seek immediate ophthalmologic evaluation prior to restarting DARZALEX. 

Interference With Serological Testing
Daratumumab binds to CD38 on red blood cells (RBCs) and results in a positive indirect antiglobulin test (indirect Coombs test). Daratumumab-mediated positive indirect antiglobulin test may persist for up to 6 months after the last daratumumab infusion. Daratumumab bound to RBCs masks detection of antibodies to minor antigens in the patient’s serum. The determination of a patient’s ABO and Rh blood type is not impacted. Notify blood transfusion centers of this interference with serological testing and inform blood banks that a patient has received DARZALEX®. Type and screen patients prior to starting DARZALEX®. 

Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia
DARZALEX® may increase neutropenia and thrombocytopenia induced by background therapy. Monitor complete blood cell counts periodically during treatment according to manufacturer’s prescribing information for background therapies. Monitor patients with neutropenia for signs of infection. Consider withholding DARZALEX® until recovery of neutrophils or for recovery of platelets.

Interference With Determination of Complete Response
Daratumumab is a human immunoglobulin G (IgG) kappa monoclonal antibody that can be detected on both the serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and immunofixation (IFE) assays used for the clinical monitoring of endogenous M-protein. This interference can impact the determination of complete response and of disease progression in some patients with IgG kappa myeloma protein. 

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
Based on the mechanism of action, DARZALEX® can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. DARZALEX® may cause depletion of fetal immune cells and decreased bone density. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females with reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with DARZALEX® and for 3 months after the last dose. 

The combination of DARZALEX® with lenalidomide, pomalidomide, or thalidomide is contraindicated in pregnant women because lenalidomide, pomalidomide, and thalidomide may cause birth defects and death of the unborn child. Refer to the lenalidomide, pomalidomide, or thalidomide prescribing information on use during pregnancy. 

ADVERSE REACTIONS
The most frequently reported adverse reactions (incidence ≥20%) were: upper respiratory infection, neutropenia, infusion-related reactions, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, constipation, anemia, peripheral sensory neuropathy, fatigue, peripheral edema, nausea, cough, pyrexia, dyspnea, and asthenia. The most common hematologic laboratory abnormalities (≥40%) with DARZALEX® are: neutropenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and anemia.  

Please click here to see the full Prescribing Information. 

IMBRUVICA® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS 
Hemorrhage: Fatal bleeding events have occurred in patients who received IMBRUVICA®. Major hemorrhage (≥ Grade 3, serious, or any central nervous system events; e.g., intracranial hemorrhage [including subdural hematoma], gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria, and post procedural hemorrhage) occurred in 4.2% of patients, with fatalities occurring in 0.4% of 2,838 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in 27 clinical trials. Bleeding events of any grade including bruising and petechiae occurred in 39%, and excluding bruising and petechiae occurred in 23% of patients who received IMBRUVICA®, respectively.  

The mechanism for the bleeding events is not well understood.  

Use of either anticoagulant or antiplatelet agents concomitantly with IMBRUVICA® increases the risk of major hemorrhage. Across clinical trials, 3.1% of 2,838 patients who received IMBRUVICA® without antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy experienced major hemorrhage. The addition of antiplatelet therapy with or without anticoagulant therapy increased this percentage to 4.4%, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy with or without antiplatelet therapy increased this percentage to 6.1%. Consider the risks and benefits of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy when co-administered with IMBRUVICA®. Monitor for signs and symptoms of bleeding.  

Consider the benefit-risk of withholding IMBRUVICA® for at least 3 to 7 days pre- and post-surgery depending upon the type of surgery and the risk of bleeding.  

Infections: Fatal and non-fatal infections (including bacterial, viral, or fungal) have occurred with IMBRUVICA® therapy. Grade 3 or greater infections occurred in 21% of 1,476 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in clinical trials. Cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) have occurred in patients treated with IMBRUVICA®. Consider prophylaxis according to standard of care in patients who are at increased risk for opportunistic infections. Monitor and evaluate patients for fever and infections and treat appropriately.  

Cardiac Arrhythmias, Cardiac Failure, and Sudden Death: Fatal and serious cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac failure have occurred with IMBRUVICA®. Deaths due to cardiac causes or sudden deaths occurred in 1% of 4,896 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in clinical trials, including in patients who received IMBRUVICA® in unapproved monotherapy or combination regimens. These adverse reactions occurred in patients with and without preexisting hypertension or cardiac comorbidities. Patients with cardiac comorbidities may be at greater risk of these events.    

Grade 3 or greater ventricular tachyarrhythmias were reported in 0.2%, Grade 3 or greater atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter were reported in 3.7%, and Grade 3 or greater cardiac failure was reported in 1.3% of 4,896 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in clinical trials, including in patients who received IMBRUVICA® in unapproved monotherapy or combination regimens. These events have occurred particularly in patients with cardiac risk factors including hypertension and diabetes mellitus, a previous history of cardiac arrhythmias, and in patients with acute infections.  

Evaluate cardiac history and function at baseline, and monitor patients for cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac function. Obtain further evaluation (e.g., ECG, echocardiogram) as indicated for patients who develop symptoms of arrhythmia (e.g., palpitations, lightheadedness, syncope, chest pain), new onset dyspnea, or other cardiovascular concerns. Manage cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac failure appropriately, follow dose modification guidelines, and consider the risks and benefits of continued IMBRUVICA® treatment.  

Hypertension: Hypertension occurred in 19% of 1,476 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in clinical trials. Grade 3 or greater hypertension occurred in 8% of patients. Based on data from 1,124 of these patients, the median time to onset was 5.9 months (range, 0.03 to 24 months). Monitor blood pressure in patients treated with IMBRUVICA®, initiate or adjust anti-hypertensive medication throughout treatment with IMBRUVICA® as appropriate, and follow dosage modification guidelines for Grade 3 or higher hypertension.  

Cytopenias: In 645 patients with B-cell malignancies who received IMBRUVICA® as a single agent, Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 23% of patients, Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia in 8% and Grade 3 or 4 anemia in 2.8%, based on laboratory measurements. Monitor complete blood counts monthly.  

Second Primary Malignancies: Other malignancies (10%), including non-skin carcinomas (3.9%), occurred among the 1,476 patients who received IMBRUVICA® in clinical trials. The most frequent second primary malignancy was non-melanoma skin cancer (6%).  

Tumor Lysis Syndrome: Tumor lysis syndrome has been infrequently reported with IMBRUVICA®. Assess the baseline risk (e.g., high tumor burden) and take appropriate precautions. Monitor patients closely and treat as appropriate.  

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on findings in animals, IMBRUVICA® can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with IMBRUVICA® and for 1 month after the last dose. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during the same time period.  

ADVERSE REACTIONS 

B-cell malignancies: The most common adverse reactions (≥30%) in adult patients with B-cell malignancies (MCL, CLL/SLL, WM and MZL) were thrombocytopenia (54.5%)*, diarrhea (43.8%), fatigue (39.1%), musculoskeletal pain (38.8%), neutropenia (38.6%)*, rash (35.8%), anemia (35.0%)*, and bruising (32.0%).

The most common Grade ≥3 adverse reactions (≥5%) in adult patients with B-cell malignancies (MCL, CLL/SLL, WM and MZL) were neutropenia (20.7%)*, thrombocytopenia (13.6%)*, pneumonia (8.2%), and hypertension (8.0%).  

Approximately 9% (CLL/SLL), 14% (MCL), 14% (WM) and 10% (MZL) of adult patients had a dose reduction due to adverse reactions. Approximately 4-10% (CLL/SLL), 9% (MCL), and 7% (WM [5%] and MZL [13%]) of patients discontinued due to adverse reactions.    

cGVHD: The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in adult or pediatric patients with cGVHD were fatigue (57%), anemia (49%)*, bruising (40%), diarrhea (36%), thrombocytopenia (33%)*, musculoskeletal pain (30%), pyrexia (30%), muscle spasms (29%), stomatitis (29%), hemorrhage (26%), nausea (26%), abdominal pain (23%), pneumonia (23%), and headache (21%).    

The most common Grade 3 or higher adverse reactions (≥5%) reported in adult or pediatric patients with cGVHD were pneumonia (14%), anemia (13%)*, fatigue (12%), pyrexia (11%), diarrhea (10%), neutropenia (10%)*, sepsis (10%), osteonecrosis (9%), stomatitis (9%), hypokalemia (7%), headache (5%), and musculoskeletal pain (5%).  

Discontinuation of IMBRUVICA® treatment due to an adverse reaction occurred in 24% of adult patients and 23% of pediatric patients. Adverse reactions leading to dose reduction occurred in 26% of adult patients and 19% of pediatric patients.  

*Treatment-emergent decreases (all grades) were based on laboratory measurements.  

DRUG INTERACTIONS 

CYP3A Inhibitors: Co-administration of IMBRUVICA® with strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors may increase ibrutinib plasma concentrations. Increased ibrutinib concentrations may increase the risk of drug-related toxicity. Dose modifications of IMBRUVICA® are recommended when used concomitantly with osaconazole, voriconazole, and moderate CYP3A inhibitors. Avoid concomitant use of other strong CYP3A inhibitors. Interrupt IMBRUVICA® if strong inhibitors are used short-term (e.g., for ≤7 days). Avoid grapefruit and Seville oranges during IMBRUVICA® treatment, as these contain strong or moderate inhibitors of CYP3A. See dose modification guidelines in USPI sections 2.3 and 7.1.    

CYP3A Inducers: Avoid coadministration with strong CYP3A inducers.  

SPECIFIC POPULATIONS  

Pediatric Use:  
The safety and effectiveness of IMBRUVICA® have been established for treatment of cGVHD  after failure of one or more lines of systemic therapy in pediatric patients 1 year of age and older. The safety and effectiveness of IMBRUVICA® have not been established for this indication in pediatric patients less than 1 year of age. 

The safety and effectiveness of IMBRUVICA® in pediatric patients have not been established in MCL, CLL/SLL, CLL/SLL with 17p deletion, WM, or MZL. 

The safety and effectiveness of IMBRUVICA® in combination with chemoimmunotherapy were assessed but have not been established based on an open-label, randomized study 

(NCT02703272) in 35 patients, which included 26 pediatric patients age 5 to less than 17 years, with previously treated mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In the randomized population, major hemorrhage and discontinuation of chemoimmunotherapy due to adverse reactions occurred more frequently in the ibrutinib plus chemoimmunotherapy arm compared to the chemoimmunotherapy alone arm.  

Hepatic Impairment:  

Adult Patients with B-cell Malignancies: Hepatic Impairment (based on Child-Pugh criteria): Avoid use of IMBRUVICA® in patients with severe hepatic impairment. In patients with mild or moderate impairment, reduce recommended IMBRUVICA® dose and monitor more frequently for adverse reactions of IMBRUVICA®.  

Patients with cGVHD: Avoid use of IMBRUVICA® in patients with total bilirubin level > 3x upper limit of normal (ULN) (unless of non-hepatic origin or due to Gilbert’s syndrome). Reduce recommended dose when administering IMBRUVICA® to patients with total bilirubin level >1.5 to 3x ULN (unless of non-hepatic origin or due to Gilbert’s syndrome).    

Please click here to see the full Prescribing Information 

RYBREVANT® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS   

Infusion Related Reactions 
RYBREVANT® can cause infusion related reactions (IRR); signs and symptoms of IRR include dyspnea, flushing, fever, chills, nausea, chest discomfort, hypotension, and vomiting.  

Based on the safety population, IRR occurred in 66% of patients treated with RYBREVANT®. Among patients receiving treatment on Week 1 Day 1, 65% experienced an IRR, while the incidence of IRR was 3.4% with the Day 2 infusion, 0.4% with the Week 2 infusion, and cumulatively 1.1% with subsequent infusions. Of the reported IRRs, 97% were Grade 1-2, 2.2% were Grade 3, and 0.4% were Grade 4. The median time to onset was 1 hour (range 0.1 to 18 hours) after start of infusion. The incidence of infusion modifications due to IRR was 62% and 1.3% of patients permanently discontinued RYBREVANT® due to IRR.    

Premedicate with antihistamines, antipyretics, and glucocorticoids and infuse RYBREVANT® as recommended. Administer RYBREVANT® via a peripheral line on Week 1 and Week 2. Monitor patients for any signs and symptoms of infusion reactions during RYBREVAT® infusion in a setting where cardiopulmonary resuscitation medication and equipment are available. Interrupt infusion if IRR is suspected. Reduce the infusion rate or permanently discontinue RYBREVANT® based on severity.  

Interstitial Lung Disease/Pneumonitis
RYBREVANT® can cause interstitial lung disease (ILD)/pneumonitis. Based on the safety population, ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 3.3% of patients treated with RYBREVANT®, with 0.7% of patients experiencing Grade 3 ILD/pneumonitis. Three patients (1%) discontinued RYBREVANT® due to ILD/pneumonitis.   

Monitor patients for new or worsening symptoms indicative of ILD/pneumonitis (e.g., dyspnea, cough, fever). Immediately withhold RYBREVANT® in patients with suspected ILD/pneumonitis and permanently discontinue if ILD/pneumonitis is confirmed.  

Dermatologic Adverse Reactions
RYBREVANT® can cause rash (including dermatitis acneiform), pruritus and dry skin. Based on the safety population, rash occurred in 74% of patients treated with RYBREVANT®, including Grade 3 rash in 3.3% of patients. The median time to onset of rash was 14 days (range: 1 to 276 days). Rash leading to dose reduction occurred in 5% of patients, and RYBREVANT® was permanently discontinued due to rash in 0.7% of patients.  

Toxic epidermal necrolysis occurred in one patient (0.3%) treated with RYBREVANT®.  

Instruct patients to limit sun exposure during and for 2 months after treatment with RYBREVANT®. Advise patients to wear protective clothing and use broad spectrum UVA/UVB sunscreen. Alcohol free emollient cream is recommended for dry skin.  

If skin reactions develop, start topical corticosteroids and topical and/or oral antibiotics. For Grade 3 reactions, add oral steroids and consider dermatologic consultation. Promptly refer patients presenting with severe rash, atypical appearance or distribution, or lack of improvement within 2 weeks to a dermatologist. Withhold, dose reduce or permanently discontinue RYBREVANT® based on severity.  

Ocular Toxicity
RYBREVANT® can cause ocular toxicity including keratitis, dry eye symptoms, conjunctival redness, blurred vision, visual impairment, ocular itching, and uveitis. Based on the safety population, keratitis occurred in 0.7% and uveitis occurred in 0.3% of patients treated with RYBREVANT®. All events were Grade 1-2. Promptly refer patients presenting with eye symptoms to an ophthalmologist. Withhold, dose reduce or permanently discontinue RYBREVANT® based on severity.  

Embryo Fetal Toxicity
Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal models, RYBREVANT® can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to the fetus. Advise female patients of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months after the final dose of RYBREVANT®.  

Adverse Reactions
The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were rash, IRR, paronychia, musculoskeletal pain, dyspnea, nausea, fatigue, edema, stomatitis, cough, constipation, and vomiting. The most common Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities (≥2%) were decreased lymphocytes, decreased albumin, decreased phosphate, decreased potassium, increased alkaline phosphatase, increased glucose, increased gamma-glutamyl transferase, and decreased sodium.  

Please read full Prescribing Information for RYBREVANT®.   

BALVERSA® Important Safety Information
Warnings and Precautions

Ocular Disorders – BALVERSA® can cause ocular disorders, including central serous retinopathy/retinal pigment epithelial detachment (CSR/RPED) resulting in visual field defect.

CSR/RPED was reported in 25% of patients treated with BALVERSA®, with a median time to first onset of 50 days. Grade 3 CSR/RPED, involving central field of vision, was reported in 3% of patients. CSR/RPED resolved in 13% of patients and was ongoing in 13% of patients at the study cutoff. CSR/RPED led to dose interruptions and reductions in 9% and 14% of patients, respectively, and 3% of patients discontinued BALVERSA®. Dry eye symptoms occurred in 28% of patients during treatment with BALVERSA® and were Grade 3 in 6% of patients. All patients should receive dry eye prophylaxis with ocular demulcents as needed.

Perform monthly ophthalmological examinations during the first 4 months of treatment and every 3 months afterwards, and urgently at any time for visual symptoms. Ophthalmological examination should include assessment of visual acuity, slit lamp examination, fundoscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Withhold BALVERSA® when CSR occurs and permanently discontinue if it does not resolve within 4 weeks or if Grade 4 in severity. For ocular adverse reactions, follow the dose modification guidelines [see Dosage and Administration (2.3)].

Hyperphosphatemia and Soft Tissue Mineralization – BALVERSA® can cause hyperphosphatemia leading to soft tissue mineralization, cutaneous calcinosis, non-uremic calciphylaxis and vascular calcification. Increases in phosphate levels are a pharmacodynamic effect of BALVERSA® [see Pharmacodynamics (12.2)]. Hyperphosphatemia was reported as adverse reaction in 76% of patients treated with BALVERSA®. The median onset time for any grade event of hyperphosphatemia was 20 days (range: 8–116) after initiating BALVERSA®. Thirty-two percent of patients received phosphate binders during treatment with BALVERSA®. Cutaneous calcinosis, non-uremic calciphylaxis and vascular calcification have been observed in 0.3% of patients treated with BALVERSA®.

Monitor for hyperphosphatemia throughout treatment. In all patients, restrict phosphate intake to 600-800 mg daily. If serum phosphate is above 7.0 mg/dL, consider adding an oral phosphate binder until serum phosphate level returns to <5.5 mg/dL. Withhold, dose reduce, or permanently discontinue BALVERSA® based on duration and severity of hyperphosphatemia [see Dosage and Administration (2.3), Table 2: Dose Modifications for Adverse Reactions].

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity – Based on the mechanism of action and findings in animal reproduction studies, BALVERSA® can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. In a rat embryo-fetal toxicity study, erdafitinib was embryotoxic and teratogenic at exposures less than the human exposures at all doses studied. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. Advise female patients of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with BALVERSA® and for one month after the last dose. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with BALVERSA® and for one month after the last dose [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1, 8.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.1)].

Most common adverse reactions including laboratory abnormalities ≥20%:

Phosphate increased (76%), stomatitis (56%), fatigue (54%), creatinine increased (52%), diarrhea (47%), dry mouth (45%), nail disorder (45%), alanine aminotransferase increased (41%), alkaline phosphatase increased (41%), sodium decreased (40%), decreased appetite (38%), albumin decreased (37%), dysgeusia (37%), hemoglobin decreased (35%), dry skin (34%), aspartate aminotransferase increased (30%), magnesium decreased (30%), dry eye (28%), alopecia (26%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (26%), constipation (28%), phosphate decreased (24%), abdominal pain (23%), calcium increased (22%), nausea (21%), and musculoskeletal pain (20%). The most common Grade 3 or greater adverse reactions (>1%) were stomatitis (9%), nail dystrophy*, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (6%), paronychia (3%), nail disorder (10%), keratitis, and hyperphosphatemia (1%).

*Included within nail disorder. Included within dry eye.

  • An adverse reaction with a fatal outcome in 1% of patients was acute myocardial infarction.
  • Serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients, including eye disorders (10%).
  • Permanent discontinuation due to an adverse reaction occurred in 13% of patients. The most frequent reasons for permanent discontinuation included eye disorders (6%).
  • Dosage interruptions occurred in 68% of patients. The most frequent adverse reactions requiring dosage interruption included hyperphosphatemia (24%), stomatitis (17%), eye disorders (17%), and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (8%).
  • Dose reductions occurred in 53% of patients. The most frequent adverse reactions for dose reductions included eye disorders (23%), stomatitis (15%), hyperphosphatemia (7%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (7%), paronychia (7%), and nail dystrophy (6%).

Drug Interactions

  • Moderate CYP2C9 or strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors: Consider alternative agents or monitor closely for adverse reactions. (7.1)
  • Strong CYP2C9 or CYP3A4 inducers: Avoid concomitant use with BALVERSA®. (7.1)
  • Moderate CYP2C9 or CYP3A4 inducers: Increase BALVERSA® dose up to 9 mg. (7.1)
  • Serum phosphate level-altering agents: Avoid concomitant use with agents that can alter serum phosphate levels before the initial dose modification period. (2.3, 7.1)
  • CYP3A4 substrates: Avoid concomitant use with sensitive CYP3A4 substrates with narrow therapeutic indices. (7.2)
  • OCT2 substrates: Consider alternative agents or consider reducing the dose of OCT2 substrates based on tolerability. (7.2)
  • P-gp substrates: Separate BALVERSA® administration by at least 6 hours before or after administration of P-gp substrates with narrow therapeutic indices. (7.2)

Use in Specific Populations

Lactation – Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions from erdafitinib in a breastfed child, advise lactating women not to breastfeed during treatment with BALVERSA® and for one month following the last dose.

Please click here to see full BALVERSA® Prescribing Information.

ERLEADA® IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Cerebrovascular and Ischemic Cardiovascular Events In a randomized study (SPARTAN) of patients with nmCRPC, ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 3.7% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 2% of patients treated with placebo. In a randomized study (TITAN) in patients with mCSPC, ischemic cardiovascular events occurred in 4.4% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 1.5% of patients treated with placebo. Across the SPARTAN and TITAN studies, 4 patients (0.3%) treated with ERLEADA® and 2 patients (0.2%) treated with placebo died from an ischemic cardiovascular event. Patients with history of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, or transient ischemic attack within 6 months of randomization were excluded from the SPARTAN and TITAN studies.

In the SPARTAN study, cerebrovascular events occurred in 2.5% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 1% of patients treated with placebo. In the TITAN study, cerebrovascular events occurred in 1.9% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 2.1% of patients treated with placebo. Across the SPARTAN and TITAN studies, 3 patients (0.2%) treated with ERLEADA®, and 2 patients (0.2%) treated with placebo died from a cerebrovascular event.

Cerebrovascular and ischemic cardiovascular events, including events leading to death, occurred in patients receiving ERLEADA®. Monitor for signs and symptoms of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disorders. Optimize management of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia. Consider discontinuation of ERLEADA® for Grade 3 and 4 events.

Fractures In a randomized study (SPARTAN) of patients with nmCRPC, fractures occurred in 12% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and in 7% of patients treated with placebo. In a randomized study (TITAN) of patients with mCSPC, fractures occurred in 9% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and in 6% of patients treated with placebo. Evaluate patients for fracture risk. Monitor and manage patients at risk for fractures according to established treatment guidelines and consider use of bone-targeted agents.

Falls — In a randomized study (SPARTAN), falls occurred in 16% of patients treated with ERLEADA® compared with 9% of patients treated with placebo. Falls were not associated with loss of consciousness or seizure. Falls occurred in patients receiving ERLEADA® with increased frequency in the elderly. Evaluate patients for fall risk.

Seizure — In two randomized studies (SPARTAN and TITAN), 5 patients (0.4%) treated with ERLEADA® and 1 patient treated with placebo (0.1%) experienced a seizure. Permanently discontinue ERLEADA® in patients who develop a seizure during treatment. It is unknown whether anti-epileptic medications will prevent seizures with ERLEADA®. Advise patients of the risk of developing a seizure while receiving ERLEADA® and of engaging in any activity where sudden loss of consciousness could cause harm to themselves or others.

Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions Fatal and life-threatening cases of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), including Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) occurred in patients receiving ERLEADA®.

Monitor patients for the development of SCARs. Advise patients of the signs and symptoms of SCARs (eg, a prodrome of fever, flu-like symptoms, mucosal lesions, progressive skin rash, or lymphadenopathy). If a SCAR is suspected, interrupt ERLEADA® until the etiology of the reaction has been determined. Consultation with a dermatologist is recommended. If a SCAR is confirmed, or for other Grade 4 skin reactions, permanently discontinue ERLEADA® [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity The safety and efficacy of ERLEADA® have not been established in females. Based on findings from animals and its mechanism of action, ERLEADA® can cause fetal harm and loss of pregnancy when administered to a pregnant female. Advise males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose of ERLEADA® [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1, 8.3)].

ADVERSE REACTIONS
The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) that occurred more frequently in the ERLEADA®-treated patients (≥2% over placebo) from the randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials (TITAN and SPARTAN) were fatigue, arthralgia, rash, decreased appetite, fall, weight decreased, hypertension, hot flush, diarrhea, and fracture.

Laboratory Abnormalities — All Grades (Grade 3-4)

  • Hematology — In the TITAN study: white blood cell decreased ERLEADA® 27% (0.4%), placebo 19% (0.6%). In the SPARTAN study: anemia ERLEADA® 70% (0.4%), placebo 64% (0.5%); leukopenia ERLEADA® 47% (0.3%), placebo 29% (0%); lymphopenia ERLEADA® 41% (1.8%), placebo 21% (1.6%)
  • Chemistry — In the TITAN study: hypertriglyceridemia ERLEADA® 17% (2.5%), placebo 12% (2.3%). In the SPARTAN study: hypercholesterolemia ERLEADA® 76% (0.1%), placebo 46% (0%); hyperglycemia ERLEADA® 70% (2%), placebo 59% (1.0%); hypertriglyceridemia ERLEADA® 67% (1.6%), placebo 49% (0.8%); hyperkalemia ERLEADA® 32% (1.9%), placebo 22% (0.5%)

Rash — In 2 randomized studies (SPARTAN and TITAN), rash was most commonly described as macular or maculopapular. Adverse reactions of rash were 26% with ERLEADA® vs 8% with placebo. Grade 3 rashes (defined as covering >30% body surface area [BSA]) were reported with ERLEADA® treatment (6%) vs placebo (0.5%).

The onset of rash occurred at a median of 83 days. Rash resolved in 78% of patients within a median of 78 days from onset of rash. Rash was commonly managed with oral antihistamines, topical corticosteroids, and 19% of patients received systemic corticosteroids. Dose reduction or dose interruption occurred in 14% and 28% of patients, respectively. Of the patients who had dose interruption, 59% experienced recurrence of rash upon reintroduction of ERLEADA®.

Hypothyroidism — In 2 randomized studies (SPARTAN and TITAN), hypothyroidism was reported for 8% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 1.5% of patients treated with placebo based on assessments of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) every 4 months. Elevated TSH occurred in 25% of patients treated with ERLEADA® and 7% of patients treated with placebo. The median onset was at the first scheduled assessment. There were no Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions. Thyroid replacement therapy, when clinically indicated, should be initiated or dose adjusted.

DRUG INTERACTIONS
Effect of Other Drugs on ERLEADA® Co-administration of a strong CYP2C8 or CYP3A4 inhibitor is predicted to increase the steady-state exposure of the active moieties. No initial dose adjustment is necessary; however, reduce the ERLEADA® dose based on tolerability [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

Effect of ERLEADA® on Other Drugs
CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and UGT Substrates — ERLEADA® is a strong inducer of CYP3A4 and CYP2C19, and a weak inducer of CYP2C9 in humans. Concomitant use of ERLEADA® with medications that are primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, CYP2C19, or CYP2C9 can result in lower exposure to these medications. Substitution for these medications is recommended when possible or evaluate for loss of activity if medication is continued. Concomitant administration of ERLEADA® with medications that are substrates of UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) can result in decreased exposure. Use caution if substrates of UGT must be co-administered with ERLEADA® and evaluate for loss of activity.

P-gp, BCRP, or OATP1B1 Substrates — Apalutamide is a weak inducer of
P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) clinically. Concomitant use of ERLEADA® with medications that are substrates of P-gp, BCRP, or OATP1B1 can result in lower exposure of these medications. Use caution if substrates of P-gp, BCRP, or OATP1B1 must be co-administered with ERLEADA® and evaluate for loss of activity if medication is continued.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for ERLEADA®.

About the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
At Janssen, we’re creating a future where disease is a thing of the past. We’re the Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, working tirelessly to make that future a reality for patients everywhere by fighting sickness with science, improving access with ingenuity, and healing hopelessness with heart. We focus on areas of medicine where we can make the biggest difference: Cardiovascular, Metabolism & Retina; Immunology; Infectious Diseases & Vaccines; Neuroscience; Oncology; and Pulmonary Hypertension.

Learn more at www.janssen.com. Follow us at @JanssenUS and @JanssenGlobal. Janssen Research & Development, LLC and Janssen Biotech, Inc. are part of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson.

The NCCN Content does not constitute medical advice and should not be used in place of seeking professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment by licensed practitioners. NCCN makes no representations or warranties and explicitly disclaims the appropriateness or applicability of the NCCN Content to any specific patient’s care or treatment.

See the NCCN Guidelines for detailed recommendations, including other treatment options.

^The NCCN Guidelines for NSCLC provide recommendations for certain individual biomarkers that should be tested and recommend testing techniques but do not endorse any specific commercially available biomarker assays or commercial laboratories.

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Cautions Concerning Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding product development and the potential benefits and treatment impact of CARVYKTI® (ciltacabtagene autoleucel), TECVAYLITM (teclistamab-cqyv), talquetamab, DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj), DARZALEX® (daratumumab), IMBRUVICA® (ibrutinib), RYBREVANT® (amivantamab-vmjw), BALVERSA® (erdafitinib), ERLEADA®(apalutamide) and nipocalimab. The reader is cautioned not to rely on these forward-looking statements. These statements are based on current expectations of future events. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or known or unknown risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results could vary materially from the expectations and projections Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Janssen Biotech, Inc., any of the other Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies and/or Johnson & Johnson. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: challenges and uncertainties inherent in product research and development, including the uncertainty of clinical success and of obtaining regulatory approvals; uncertainty of commercial success; manufacturing difficulties and delays; competition, including technological advances, new products and patents attained by competitors; challenges to patents; product efficacy or safety concerns resulting in product recalls or regulatory action; changes in behavior and spending patterns of purchasers of health care products and services; changes to applicable laws and regulations, including global health care reforms; and trends toward health care cost containment. A further list and descriptions of these risks, uncertainties and other factors can be found in Johnson & Johnson’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 1, 2023, including in the sections captioned “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” and in Johnson & Johnson’s subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Copies of these filings are available online at www.sec.gov, www.jnj.com or on request from Johnson & Johnson. None of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies nor Johnson & Johnson undertakes to update any forward-looking statement as a result of new information or future events or developments.

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