Skip to content

Internet Explorer is no longer supported by this website.

For optimal browsing we recommend using Chrome, Firefox or Safari.
Heart icon (animated) heart icon (static)
Our Initiatives
Explore more Johnson & Johnson sites:
A graphic of the flag of Australia alt
A graphic of the flag of Argentina alt
A graphic of the flag of Brazil alt
A graphic of the national flag of Canada alt
A graphic of the flag of Chile alt
A graphic of the national flag of the People's Republic of China alt
A graphic of the national flag of Colombia alt
A graphic of the national flag of Ecuador alt
A graphic of the flag of Germany alt
A graphic of the national flag of India alt
A graphic of the national flag of Japan alt
A graphic of the flag of Mexico alt
A graphic of the flag of Paraguay alt
A graphic of the flag of Peru alt
A graphic of the flag of Russia alt
Switzerland
A graphic of the flag of Switzerland alt
A graphic of the national flag of Uruguay alt
A graphic of the flag of Venezuela alt
David Julius, Ph.D., (right) with Johnson & Johnson's Paul Stoffels, M.D., in 2013
Share
Did you enjoy reading this story? Click the heart to show your love.
Empty Heart Icon
13
Latest News

Johnson & Johnson Award Winner David Julius, Ph.D., Receives a 2021 Nobel Prize

Share
Did you enjoy reading this story? Click the heart to show your love.
Empty Heart Icon
13
The company honored him in 2013 with a Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research; now he's a Nobel Laureate. Learn about the transformational research that's led to these well-deserved scientific accolades.
Today's Top Reads Close

The ability to feel heat or cold is so second-nature to us that we don't often question how we experience these sensations. But it was only relatively recently that researchers discovered the molecular mechanisms that control thermosensation—the sensory perception of temperature.

For his discovery of how stimuli like these are detected by the body, and its potential application for use in treating medical conditions like acute and inflammatory pain, David Julius, Ph.D., a professor of physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, was awarded the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He shares the honor with Ardem Patapoutian, Ph.D., a professor at Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, for his parallel body of work revealing how we perceive touch and pressure.

Winning the Nobel Prize is, of course, a major career highlight. But it wasn't Dr. Julius' first award recognition. Among other previous honors, his research earned him a Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research in 2013.

Quote icon (top)

My research was born out of a fascination with, and desire to comprehend, how the body reacts to stimuli from ordinary foods, like chili peppers. I am proud that my work may lead to more effective treatments for people living with diseases like arthritis, asthma and chronic pain.

Quote icon (bottom) Share
Did you enjoy reading this story? Click the heart to show your love.
Empty Heart Icon
13

The Legacy of the Dr. Paul Janssen Award


Since 2004, the Dr. Paul Janssen Award has been given to an active scientist in academia, industry or at a scientific institute who has made a significant contribution toward the improvement of public health. Winners are chosen each year by an independent selection committee composed of some of the world's leading scientists, including Nobel Laureates and past winners of The Dr. Paul Janssen Award, which was established to honor the innovative namesake of what is now called the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. Dr. Julius is now the sixth Dr. Paul Janssen Award winner to have received a Nobel Prize.

Awardees of the Dr. Paul Janssen Award share a $200,000 cash prize to further their work and each receives a sculpture with the inscription of "What's New?"—the question Dr. Paul, as he was affectionately known, asked daily in his research and development lab to inspire and encourage his colleagues to seek new compounds that might one day lead to new medicines for patients.

This year's winners, Katalin Karikó, Ph.D., and Drew Weissman, M.D., Ph.D., were honored for their foundational work that enabled the use of messenger RNA (mRNA) in COVID-19 vaccine development.

At the time of his Dr. Paul Janssen Award win, Dr. Julius had this to say about the achievement: “My research was born out of a fascination with, and desire to comprehend, how the body reacts to stimuli from ordinary foods, like chili peppers, with a particular focus on the molecular basis of pain sensation. I am proud that my work may lead to more effective treatments for people living with diseases like arthritis, asthma and chronic pain.”

Johnson & Johnson congratulates Dr. Julius on his Nobel Prize achievement and his pioneering discoveries.

Did you enjoy reading this story? Click the heart to show your love.
Empty Heart Icon
13
See how past awardees have left a lasting legacy with their own scientific breakthroughs.

More from Johnson & Johnson

This site uses cookies as described in our Cookie Policy. Please click the "Accept" button or continue to use our site if you agree to our use of cookies.
Close cookie banner icon
You are now leaving jnj.com. The site you’re being redirected to is a branded pharmaceutical website. Please click below to continue to that site.
Continue