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      HomeOur CompanyFinding harmony at the intersection of health and hip-hop
      A graphic that features the four women on the mibo show
      Our Company

      Finding harmony at the intersection of health and hip-hop

      Uniting music industry icons with health and wellness experts, “the mibo show” offers a trusted and refreshingly candid take on a range of health issues impacting communities of color. Partnering with Johnson & Johnson and hosted by Shanti Das, the new podcast tackles everything from mental health to heart disease to hip replacements—helping change the culture of healthcare, one episode at a time.

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      Multiple studies have shown that the world’s health systems need transformation to better serve, inform and treat people of color. As part of Our Race to Health Equity (ORTHE), Johnson & Johnson is launching initiatives that systemically address deeply rooted health inequities, connect communities of color with vital health information and change the culture of healthcare to meet the needs of all people.

      Arguably, the leading approach to improving health literacy (and, in turn, health outcomes) is improving access to health information and education. However, focusing on accessibility alone fails to address another barrier for communities of color: mistrust of the medical system.

      That’s why we’re doing this show—to bring resources and lived experiences to the community—so we can talk about mental and physical health.
      Shanti Das

      Johnson & Johnson is taking steps to bridge this gap and connect with communities of color in meaningful, lasting ways—with the help of key community leaders. To that end, Johnson & Johnson is participating in a new podcast, “the mibo show,” hosted by entertainment veteran and mental health advocate Shanti Das.

      In each episode, Das sits down with a hip-hop trailblazer and an expert from Johnson & Johnson to have timely, candid and culture-forward conversations around mind and body wellness—especially challenges affecting communities of color. As each guest discusses their own mental and/or physical health journey, Johnson & Johnson subject matter experts offer health-related stats, industry insights and strategies to encourage us all to live a healthy lifestyle where we prioritize our mind and body wellness on a regular basis.

      The resulting dialogue—a mix of intimate, conversational quips from well-known figures, coupled with more hard-hitting medical data from trusted experts—is precisely the formula that makes this podcast work.

      “We know we can’t do it alone, so we have to be partners; we have to leverage opportunity and resources where they exist, and then we have to create opportunity and resources,” said Dr. JaBaris D. Swain, Medical Executive, Health Systems Integration| Cardiovascular & Metabolism, Medical Affairs at Johnson & Johnson Innovative Medicine, in a recent episode of “the mibo show.”

      Leveraging the Power of Hip-Hop Culture to Connect with Communities

      Hip-hop is the perfect avenue to broach discussions on mental and physical health in communities of color. Born in the Bronx in the summer of ’73, hip-hop has made an indelible mark on music and culture over the past half-century—influencing art, dance, entertainment, fashion, language, politics and so much more. Hip-hop also authentically connects with groups in ways that traditional medical systems often can’t (or, rather, haven’t).

      “I applaud and appreciate these artists for sharing their stories and experiences with Shanti and the show’s audience,” said Johnson & Johnson Executive Vice President for Global and Corporate Affairs Vanessa Broadhurst, who has also appeared on the show. “We know there are many challenges surrounding health inequity, but we can continue to combat and eradicate them through open discussions on innovative platforms such as “the mibo show.”

      We know there are many challenges surrounding health inequity, but we can continue to combat and eradicate them through open discussions on innovative platforms such as “the mibo show.”
      Vanessa Broadhurst

      From Charlamagne Tha God detailing his personal battle with anxiety to MC Lyte sharing anecdotes specific to women’s health, “the mibo show” gives hip-hop artists a platform that normalizes the discussion of health issues, promotes awareness and education, and highlights the power of music in effecting positive change.

      “That’s why we’re doing this show—to bring resources and lived experiences to the community—so we can talk about mental and physical health,” said Das on a recent episode.

      You can listen to the full episodes of “the mibo show” on your preferred podcast platform or subscribe to and watch the episodes on YouTube.

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