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      Innovation
      A collage of four innovations from Johnson & Johnson

      13 innovations that inspired us in 2023

      A treatment for an incurable cancer. Catheters to better diagnose and treat AFib. A surgical stapler that’s easier to use. These are just some of the Johnson & Johnson advances that are helping improve the health of people everywhere.
      Health & wellness
      Imaging of stroke in a patient

      Inside the science of strokes

      Strokes are responsible for around 140,000 deaths a year in the United States alone. For World Stroke Day, learn how Johnson & Johnson is innovating to help change that stat.
      Health & wellness
      A close-up of someone with green and yellow blood pressure cuffs on their legs

      5 things we now know about peripheral artery disease

      The common circulatory condition is a leading cause of amputations in the U.S. Learn why Black Americans are disproportionately affected and how Johnson & Johnson is helping to raise awareness about the disease.
      Health & wellness
      Illustration of one person speaking to another with a mix of letters in a speech bubble

      What it really feels like to have aphasia

      Imagine if you were trying to speak and no one could understand you. That’s what it’s like to live with this language-impairing condition. For National Aphasia Awareness Month, learn how to spot the symptoms of the neurological disorder and what to do if you’re afflicted.
      Innovation
      Lede-She Oversees One of the World's Largest Healthcare Businesses: 7 Questions for Ashley McEvoy in the Time of COVID-19.jpg

      She oversees one of the world’s largest healthcare businesses: 7 questions for Ashley McEvoy in the time of COVID-19

      Johnson & Johnson develops consumer products, medical devices and pharmaceuticals—and McEvoy is at the helm of its global Medical Devices Companies. She shares how she has navigated the pandemic, grown professionally and personally as a result, and helped impact the lives of millions during this unique moment in history.
      Personal stories
      Valarie Tucker at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

      “I’m one of the more than half a million people who can go years undiagnosed": A woman shares the story of her shocking AFib Diagnosis

      The heart condition affects up to 6 million Americans, and raises the risk of stroke five-fold. For National Women’s Heart Week, one patient describes what it was like to learn she had atrial fibrillation—and the unexpected positive impact it has had on her life.
      Innovation
      Silver-haired woman exercising and wearing her fitness watch.

      Can an Apple Watch reduce the likelihood of suffering a stroke? The innovative study that’s tackling the problem of AFib

      Cardiologist C. Michael Gibson is heading up a virtual research study that uses wearable technology and cutting-edge apps to help detect atrial fibrillation, one of the biggest risk factors for stroke. We dive into how the study will work.
      Health & wellness
      Two women eating a healthy meal

      The facts about weight-loss surgery: Medical experts debunk 6 common myths

      If getting healthy is one of your resolutions—and you’ve wondered about bariatric surgery—here are answers to some common questions, including what BMI you really need to have to qualify for the procedure and whether you can expect to gain any weight back.
      Personal stories
      Stroke survivor Lisa Deck with her husband and children

      “I had four strokes and two brain surgeries—and survived”

      Lisa Deck was just 21 when she had her first stroke. She would go on to have three more, as well as face a rare diagnosis of moyamoya disease. For World Stroke Day, we’re sharing her incredible story of survival and living with a chronic illness.
      Health & wellness
      A family tree graphic surrounded by DNA

      Do heart disease, diabetes, or prostate cancer run in your family tree? Experts share how you can help reduce your risk

      Your DNA doesn’t have to determine your medical future if you consider taking some steps to help lower your chances of developing these conditions, which tend to have genetic ties.